Browsing Tag

Caregiving

— Relationships —

pin it

My parents helped me so much with my kids when they were little. Loving, experienced… and free caregivers. It don’t get much better than that. Fortunately my folks lived close, so often my kids went to their place.

But many grandparents live far away, or take care of grandkids at their children’s home. Even when coming for a social visit, they often end up babysitting, and trust me. They love it. Continue Reading

— Relationships —

I knew Chantilly would be a good companion kitty for Penney, and we bonded, just like that! She'd already been spayed and had a microchip. Good work City Critters!
pin it

I live and work in one of the largest cities in the world, have a lot of wonderful friends, but what would I do without my sweet kitties? Continue Reading

— Relationships —

Candy Martin, President, American Gold Star Mothers
pin it

Did you know the last Sunday in September is Mother’s Day? While it’s not the traditional mother’s day most of us think of, Gold Star Mother’s Day is reserved for mothers who’ve lost a son or daughter in the active service of our country. Gold Star Mothers is a nonprofit, nonpolitical organization dedicated to continuing the service their fallen sons and daughters cannot finish. It’s been almost 100 years since Gold Star Mothers first came into existence.

During World War I, Grace Darling Seibold stopped receiving letters from her son, George. Every day she went to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C., hoping to find him among the wounded.

Continue Reading

— Relationships —

pin it

Last night I slept 14 hours. It’s now late afternoon, and I just awoke from a three-hour nap. I still feel like I could crawl into bed and crank out another eight or nine hours of deep REM before facing another day. No, I don’t have the flu, or narcolepsy, or a colossal hangover, but I have been serving as mother/hostess to a bevy of late teens and 20-somethings over a V-E-R-Y  L-O-N-G holiday weekend. Continue Reading

— Relationships —

pin it

Booker’s toupee was an exaggerated version of Frankie Avalon’s pompadour in the 60’s film, Beach Blanket Bingo. It was an odd-looking hairpiece that perched on Booker’s head like a renegade dust bunny, curled up for an afternoon nap. Booker liked to rattle-off names of Texas vegetation: “Bluestem, switchgrass, purpletop and drop seed.” Just when you thought he was finished, he’d let out a long sigh and continue with “scurf peas, prairie clover and Englemann daisies.”

When he was younger, Booker wanted to be a barber, but the only job he could get was barbering in a nearby asylum where manic depressives, old folks and autistic children were warehoused like rolls of cheap carpet.

Continue Reading

— Relationships —

La Réserve B&B, Giverny
pin it

How do I begin to describe the best things about my recent trip to France? Let’s start with my newfound love affair with Air France; new friends; Maison Laudrée’s legendary macarons; the Eiffel Tower at night; the gilt and grandeur of Versailles; the d’Orsay and Rodin Museums; decorative French Ironwork; tall walnut doors and old parquet floors; La Réserve B&B in Giverny; the beauty that is 1010 Park Place’s own Esther Zimmer, inside and out–Essie came from London and met me in Paris!–or that water is served in wine bottles.

I learned several things about self-care, although to my surprise, not where I expected to find it: in the Extreme Self-Care Retreat.

Continue Reading

— Relationships —

pin it

One look at Paul Kiger’s blog, Big Green Pen or any of her social media pages, and you realize Paula supports everyone from our men and women in the military to children and caregivers around the world. Paula Kiger gives back to the community at large more than anyone I know, and she does it with enthusiasm and a genuine heart. Paula’s always posting blogs about people and everyday heroes she meets; other people’s acts of kindness; children in need of healthcare and ways her readers can help.

The real hero in my book is Paula Kiger.

Continue Reading

— Relationships —

pin it

Mother weighs less than 90 pounds. She hasn’t walked in over a year, and her leg muscles are drawn into a near-fetal position. The skin on her haunches is so thin it breaks open, and her care providers and I fear an infection.

It’s been heartbreaking to walk with her through the valley of the shadow of her death. To be honest, I’m amazed she’s still here. Did I tell you, mother has dementia?

Continue Reading

— Life —

pin it

Today I sit with mother in the beauty shop at her dementia facility. It’s become more difficult to make out her words, but her eyes say everything. “I think I need a psychiatrist, she says.” Her voice is soft and raspy. “I can’t remember things.”

Mother’s lived in this facility for six years. When I tell her she has dementia, she nods like she understands, and then starts fretting all over again. Nothing I say or do breaks her cycle of fear or her obsessive picking at the bump on the top of her nose. A bump of her creation.

My thoughts shift to another beauty parlor. Mother’s hairdresser stands next to me, a pair of scissors in his hand, waiting for her instructions.

Continue Reading

— Relationships —

Photo credit, Carolyn Taylor
pin it

Eleven years ago this month I was diagnosed with breast cancer. Being told you have cancer is one of the most frightening things that can happen to you. I survived 10 breast cancer surgeries and eight rounds of chemo, but I didn’t do it alone. I did it with the grace of God; great medical treatment; a loving husband who went to every doctor visit, lab test and hospital stay and friends who were there in every way imaginable.

I know of a woman who wasn’t as fortunate. Her story will make you question everything you think you know about people.

Continue Reading